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Friday, August 20, 2021 | History

3 edition of Increasing forage yields and sheep production on intermountain winter ranges found in the catalog.

Increasing forage yields and sheep production on intermountain winter ranges

Selar S. Hutchings

Increasing forage yields and sheep production on intermountain winter ranges

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Great Basin.
    • Subjects:
    • Forage plants -- Great Basin.,
    • Sheep -- Great Basin.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementSelar S. Hutchings and George Stewart.
      SeriesCircular / United States Department of Agriculture ;, no. 925, Circular (United States. Dept. of Agriculture) ;, no. 925.
      ContributionsStewart, George, b. 1888.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsSF375 .H83
      The Physical Object
      Pagination64 p. :
      Number of Pages64
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL238591M
      LC Control Numberagr53000299
      OCLC/WorldCa5193902

      • Improve yield and plant longevity by providing guidance for selection, and establishment of adapted and compatible plant varieties, species, and cultivars. • Improve or maintain livestock nutrition and/or health. • compatibility with other species. Verify Provide or increase forage supply during periods of low forage production. Sheep. See also what's at Wikipedia, your library, or elsewhere. Broader terms: Livestock; Ovis; Related terms: Shepherds; Wool; Narrower terms: Sheep -- Australia. Grasses and forage plants. A practical treatise comprising their natural history, comparative nutritive value, methods of cultivating, cutting, and curing; and the management of grass lands in the United States and British provinces. (Boston, J. E. Tilton, ), . An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video. An illustration of an audio speaker. Audio. An illustration of a " floppy .


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Increasing forage yields and sheep production on intermountain winter ranges by Selar S. Hutchings Download PDF EPUB FB2

A year study of intermountain winter ranges in respect of the utilization of forage species by sheep, the influence of precipitation on herbage production and plant density and the effects of grazing intensity on forage yields and on sheep and wool production, is reported.

The ranges are characterized by low precipitation and scant by: Increasing forage yields and sheep production on intermountain winter ranges By Selar S.

(Selar Stephen) Hutchings and George Stewart Abstract. of Intermountain winter ranges found that wher- Increasing forage yields and sheep production on intermountain winter ranges. Dep. Agr. Circ. 13 p. HUTCHINGS, SELAR S. Managing winter sheep range for greater profit.

Dep. Agr. Farmer s by: 3. Buy Increasing Forage Yields and Sheep Production on Intermountain Winter Ranges (Classic Reprint) by Hutchings, Selar S online on at best prices.

Fast and free shipping free returns cash on delivery available on eligible : Selar S Hutchings. Download or read online Increasing Forage Yields and Sheep Production on Intermountain Winter Ranges written by Selar Stephen Hutchings, published by Unknown which was released on Get Increasing Forage Yields and Sheep Production on Intermountain Winter Ranges Books now.

Available in PDF, ePub and Kindle. GET BOOK. Beatley JC () Survival of winter annuals in the northern Mojave Desert. Ecology Increasing forage yields and sheep production on Intermountain winter ranges.

USDA Circular Correlations of precipitation and temperature with spring regrowth and mature crested wheatgrass yields. Range Manage. Google. experimental sheep. Forage production, utilization, and composition of the diet Browse produced an average of 73 percent of the forage available to the sheep during the winter seasons, grasses produced 26 percent and a forb (Rus- sian-thistle) one percent.

Average utilization was approximately. Range forage evaluation by the range condition method. For. 10 Increasing forage yields and sheep production on intermountain winter ranges. USDA Circ. Google Scholar. Hyder, D. Defoliation in relation to vegetative growth.

In: The biology and utilization of grasses. Academic Press, New York. Assuming similar summer and winter ranges for the mule deer herd, the summer-range density of deer is roughly deer km-2 and the winter-range density is deer km Thus, the total wild ungulate density is about animals km-2 on the summer range and animals km on the winter range.

During the study period a combined 2, cow. The conclusion was reached that for both plant yield and to meet sheep winter feed requirements the kale crop sown in 15 cm rows was much superior to the three root crops.

INTRODUCTION Although ,QOO_ h~. of forage crops (swedes, turnips, mangels, fodder beet and kale) are grown in N. each. Winter barley varieties are the next species to head out in the spring and need to be seeded the earliest of the winter grains.

Generally, this is the best winter forage for neutral detergent fiber digestibility (NDFd). Feekes 9 is the goal for best crude protein and digestible fiber. Extension Team Forage.

OUR MISSION | To develop and disseminate research-based information that will enhance profitable forage production and utilization while sustaining Wisconsins natural resources. About the Team Forage Website. The site brings together a variety of forage crop related resources from University of Wisconsin faculty in different disciplines, departments, and locations.

Discussed are the forages best suited to sheep production, the particular advantages of each forage, and recommended procedures for growing, grazing and or harvesting them. Also presented are general management practices for sheep on pasture and an example of how 30 acres of land can be utilized to supply the forage needs of a ewe flock.

drier times of the grazing season. This results in a much lower forage yield on the sensitive areas than if grazing had been controlled and allowed only within the limitations of the site. Allowing grazing only when the forages are at the proper stage of growth will improve and maintain forage health and vigor, resulting in a higher seasonal yield.

Sheep production is the most important livestock activity in Hidalgo State (México), represents the second national producer and it is the main provider of sheep meat to the Mexico City market. FORAGES FOR SHEEP Profitable lamb production is highly dependent upon efficient production and use of forage crops.

Harvesting of the forage crops by the sheep themselves, with as little supplemental feeding as possible, is the most practical and economical means to ensure the success of a sheep. Survey results revealed that 80 of ranches had more than sheep, and 47 of respondents utilized winter range for to day periods throughout production year.

While on winter range the. continuous recropping. Generally, winter cereals have consistently higher forage production potential than spring cereals due to better water used patterns. One exception occurred in (45 of normal September through April precipitation) where spring hay barley forage yields exceeded those of winter.

Forage Realistic Yield Potential Crops Yield Units Realistic YieldsAcre Winter Peas Arrowleaf Clover Austrian Winter Pea Ball Clover Note: Potential nitrogen production will only be obtained when clover is in full bloom.

Most cover crops are killed prior to full. Dutch and medium white clovers are recommended for sheep pastures, especially for mixing with Kentucky bluegrass.

Ladino clover is the tallest growing type but is short lived. Soil pH should be at least Red Clover is the most common pasture legume species in Wisconsin. It is a fast-establishing clover. Forage water content required to meet water needs according to species and production state during cool weather (Production State Forage water Sheep non-lactating, first 23 pregnancy last 30 days of pregnancy -singles The temperature may range from to o C in winter and from o C in summer.

The average annual rainfall is between and mm, with most of the rain falling in summer (Bureau of Statistics, ; ). Owing to its mountainous character, much of Lesotho is well suited for Angora goat and sheep production (Hunter, ).

result in greater spring forage production than spring planting. Small Grains as Forage Typically, fall forage yield for small grain forages is nega - tively correlated with winter hardiness. This means that oats and winter-sensitive (spring) varieties of triticale, wheat, and barley will yield more in the fall than cereal rye or winter-hardy.

Despite the droughty fall and winter conditions, overall forage production was good to excellent at Burneyville again this season. Yields ranged from to dry poundsacre on the early planting. The ryes generally produced the most forage throughout the growing season.

The top five forage producers for each small grain are as follows. sudangrass, and sorghum-sudangrass hybrids range from to inches of water per ton of yield. Efficiency for oats, a cool-season annual, is estimated at to inches per ton, cool-season perennial grasses at about 5 to 6 inches per ton; and alfalfa at to inches per ton.

Under limited water allocations, forage water-use effi. Winter triticale development lines, KT98SRT 3 and Kolding B (has a facultative nature], produced the highest forage yields of 12 winter cereals seeded under dryland crop-fallow conditions.

The forage yield of 22 winter spelt entries were generally equal to or better than Tiber hard red winter wheat in good crop-fallow conditions. In addition to yield increases, many studies have demonstrated that adequate levels of soil K reduce bermudagrass winter injury and increase survival after freezing temperatures [88,89].

In addition to the negative impacts on forage production, K deficiency has also been linked to reductions in stand integrity and increases in pest and disease.

Applied research efforts included projects to assess the use of annual forages to enhance whole farm forage utilization in sheep production systems, understanding nutrient requirements and optimizing diets of sheep during the transition between late pregnancy and early lactation, out of season breeding field studies, evaluation of local.

A final report submitted to USDA Forest Service Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station. Range Mgt. Hutchings, S. and G. Stewart (l) Increasing Forage Yields and Sheep Production on Intermountain Winter Ranges. Washington, D. : USDA.

Smith, M. J. Malecheck, and K. Fulgham (l) Forage selection by. Costes-Thiré, M.Villalba, J. and Ginane, C. Increased intake of tannin-rich sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia) pellets by parasitized and non-parasitized sheep after a period of conditioning.

The American Dairy Science Association (ADSA), the American Society of Animal Science (ASAS), Joint Annual Meeting. a carry-over of forage into the winter when forage production is limited by cold, short, cloudy days.

Proper stocking for fall and winter will result in excess forage in the spring. A producer needs to use this extra forage wisely. Additional livestock can be added in the spring or the excess growth can be harvested for hay.

In any case, excess. Forage yield was increased about fold over that of the control using a waxed-soil runoff area two times the crop growing area. Adjusting yields for the size of the bare runoff areas, the average yield increase for the system was still five times greater than that which would have been obtained from an uninterrupted planting of grass.

range of conditions. It produces most of its annual yield during late spring and summer with little growth fall. However, research in Arkansas showed stockpiled bermudagrass can produce significant forage yield in late summer that can be grazed during late fall to reduce hay have similar growing seasons as bermudagrass and can also be stock.

Forage yields for crabgrass generally range between 1 and 5 tonsacre, but one should expect yields to be 3 to 4 tonsacre. These yields are slightly lower than those typical of other warm season annuals; thus, a stocking rate of ~ stockers (~ lbsstocker)acre should be expected.

Biodiversity Heritage Library. By: Needham, Daniel. Advice to shepherds and owners of flocks on the care and management of sheep. Publication info: Boston,Printed by J.

Belcher, Holding Institution: University of California Libraries () Alberta sheep production. Biggle sheep book (15 F) Breeding Shropshires ring and market () (63 F) Forest growth and sheep grazing in the Cascade mountains of Oregon (1 F) I Increasing forage yields and sheep production on intermountain winter ranges Stocking northern Great Plains sheep range for sustained high production (5 F).

Annual Forage Options. Jerry D. Volesky. Range Forage Specialist. West Central Res. Ext. Center. West State Farm Rd. North Platte, NE () jvolesky1 Sustainable Use of Crop Residues. Pasture Production with Selected Forage Species.

Many species of grasses and legumes serve as forages. However, not all forage species are suited to New Hampshires climate and growing season, nor are all species adapted to grazing by animals.

To be productive in a pasture system, a plant needs to be able to withstand frequent defoliation. rangelands documenting forage production and cover comparisons since the s.

As a result, land manag-ers lack data-driven recommendations of forage spe-cies and cannot adequately assess the efficiency or cost effectiveness of seeding. Seeding forage and weed control In addition to increasing forage production, seeding. Domestic sheep show greater use in winter than summer months and typically feed upon central portions of James' galleta tufts, leaving coarser growth around the edges.

Desert bighorn sheep of the Mojave Desert utilize James' galleta as forage [ 84 ]. Range Improvements- Ways to Increase Forage Production Range improvements are changes made by managers to purposefully change the vegetation with the intent to improve and increase forage quantity and quality.

Through the range management planning process, producers will have identified their tacklingproblems and the opportunities for.Global Range: Achnatherum hymendoides is a wide ranging species, occuring over much of western North Canada, it is found in southwestern Yukon Territory and it ranges from British Columbia east to Manitoba.

Its range continues south through the United States to northern Mexico (FNA ).Nutrient Management for Forage Production Herdsmanship School, Hall Why learn about soils? • For good forage yields, and cover for livestock and wildlife • To protect the environment • For efficient use of resources (water, fertilizer, $) • Can increase yield and/or save on fertilizer costs, and decrease environmental risks.